Chicken Cutlet Curry

CHICKEN KATSU CURRY

  • By
    Takako Gamazawa
  • Time
    40 minutes
Chicken Cutlet Curry

Following the pork katsu curry (curry with pork cutlet) recipe, this chicken katsu curry dish (curry with chicken cutlet), has fewer calories and checks all the boxes for a delicious meal.
It is best for those who want to try a Japanese curry with a deep-fried topping, but are calorie conscious.

Chicken and Nutrition
Chicken is healthier than pork or beef.
This recipe calls for chicken breast, which contains protein, which is one of the three major nutrients essential for health. It is significant for building and maintaining many parts of the body, such as muscles, hair, skin, and internal organs.
Chicken aids in physical activity, helps digestion, and improves your immune system. It’s a good contributor for training, fitness, health and beauty.

Japanese-Style Dish with Chicken Katsu
This chicken katsu, which uses chicken breast, is hearty and satisfying with a light and clean taste.
To make the most of the light umami taste of the curry roux, we mix in ginger and soy sauce.
It is refreshing in taste and not too hard on the stomach, so you can include potatoes in the roux for an extra delicious addition if you like.
Adding coriander seed powder or chili powder at the end to match your tastes also delivers a rich, pleasant aroma.
It’s also a fun idea to stuff the chicken breast with cheese before frying.

Nutrition per Serving
  • Calories
    1319
  • Sodium
    1950mg
  • Fat
    56.7g
  • Protein
    59.6g
  • Carbs
    156.7g
  • Fiber
    15g
  • Cholesterol
    240mg

Ingredients

Servings
-
2
+
Imperial
  • slices Chicken breasts (0.44lb / 200g each)
  • a pinch Salt
  • a pinch Pepper
  • as needed Flour
  • as needed Breadcrumbs
  • Egg
  • 3.5  oz Onion
  • 2.4  oz Carrot
  • 5.2  oz Potato
  • oz Ginger
  • 2.1  cup Water
  • servings Japanese curry roux
  • tbsp Soy sauce
  • 0.5  tsp Cumin powder
  • tsp Chicken bouillon powder
  • bowls Steamed rice
  • as needed Vegetable oil (deep-frying oil)
  • to taste Fukushin-zuke (pickles) or rakkyo-zuke (pickles)

Instructions

Step 1

Roughly chop the onion and carrot. Grate the ginger, leaving the skin on.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 2

Cut the potatoes into bite-sized pieces.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 3

Heat a pan and add vegetable oil. Saute ginger, onion and carrot slowly over low heat.
When the onions become translucent, add the potatoes and saute quickly.

Step 4

Add water and chicken bouillon powder, cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 5

Remove any scum off the top of the mixture.
Turn off the heat and stir in the curry roux.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 6

Over low to medium heat, add soy sauce and simmer for 10 minutes, then finish with cumin powder and turn off the heat.

Step 7

To prepare the chicken breast for deep frying, they should be of more or less uniform thickness. To do this, use a kitchen knife to cut away the thicker parts without cutting all the way through. Then fold back the cut portion to create a single piece of chicken that is thinner and roughly the same thickness throughout.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 8

Carefully cover the chicken with flour, beaten egg and breadcrumbs in that order.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 9

Deep-fry in oil at 338-356°F ​(170-180°C) until golden brown.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Step 10

Cut the chicken cutlet into easy to eat strips, place on a bowl of rice, and pour curry roux over the top.
Garnish with fukujinzuke or rakkyo pickles.

Chicken Cutlet Curry

Japanese Local Culinary Expert

Takako worked as a cook in a hotel Japanese restaurant and a nursery school food service. Currently, in addition to holding cooking classes in Tokyo, she is also involved in a wide range of activities, including cooking classes for corporate events, instructors, recipe development, column writing, and food education classes at elementary schools. While visiting major production areas around the country and researching local cuisine and food culture, she concentrates on developing recipes that incorporate the charms and essences of local regions.